MUMBAI’S DAME-SCHOOLED DAMSEL SCORES AN INGRESS INTO MIT

17-Year old Malvika Raj Joshi, a budding dame-schooled lassie from Mumbai, hogged acceptance into the prestigious Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Thanks to her computing dexterity. MIT has catered her a bursary on the footing of her being a three-time medal victory at the international Olympiad in informatics. Ironically, Joshi faced a repudiation from the IIT’s for merely not holding the typical X and XII certificates. The lone center that shouldered her was the Chennai Mathematical Institute (CMI) where Joshi was matriculated in an M.Sc level course, as her apprehension was on par with B.Sc. It is an image to MIT’s liability that they can proffer admission to a student who demonstrates the sterling intellectual potential despite having no formal high school credentials. Malvika evokes those timely days during an email reciprocation from Boston. “When I started unschooling 4 years back, I began exploring many different subjects. Programming was one of them. I found it interesting and would give it more time than to other subjects”, she said. This teenager’s captivating story floats when her mother Supriya clutched an inconceivably rugged decision. Joshi was in her VII grade at DadarParsee Youth Assembly School in Mumbai and was doing exceedingly well in academics when her mother decided to pull her out. “ We make a middle-class family. Malvika was doing great in school but somehow I felt that Happiness is more important than conventional knowledge. I was working with an NGO that takes care of cancer patients. I would see students who were in their VII or IX standard being affected by cancer. It affected me deeply and I decided that my daughters need to be happy. The decision was no easy one. In India, people are still unaware about the term ‘Homeschooled’ or ‘Unschooled’. It took time to convince Mr.Joshi, as it was a risky proposition, that’s when I created a simulation (classroom like situation) at home. It worked. Suddenly I saw my daughter was so happy. She was learning more than ever – Knowledge became her passion”, said the proud mother. When queried her if parents crave to learn about her daughter, she laughs as she says, “They are all interested in knowing how to get into MIT. I just tell them that we never aimed for her admission in MIT, also I advise parents to understand what interests their children”.

This teenager’s captivating story floats when her mother Supriya clutched an inconceivably rugged decision. Joshi was in her VII grade at DadarParsee Youth Assembly School in Mumbai and was doing exceedingly well in academics when her mother decided to pull her out. “ We make a middle-class family. Malvika was doing great in school but somehow I felt that Happiness is more important than conventional knowledge. I was working with an NGO that takes care of cancer patients. I would see students who were in their VII or IX standard being affected by cancer. It affected me deeply and I decided that my daughters need to be happy. The decision was no easy one. In India, people are still unaware about the term ‘Homeschooled’ or ‘Unschooled’. It took time to convince Mr.Joshi, as it was a risky proposition, that’s when I created a simulation (classroom like situation) at home. It worked. Suddenly I saw my daughter was so happy. She was learning more than ever – Knowledge became her passion”, said the proud mother. When queried her if parents crave to learn about her daughter, she laughs as she says, “They are all interested in knowing how to get into MIT. I just tell them that we never aimed for her admission in MIT, also I advise parents to understand what interests their children”.

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